A Review of the book “Rejection Proof” by Jia Jiang

I don’t think I have an especially difficult time with handling rejection. I think I see the whole thing somewhat like the Donald Kaufman character in my favorite scene of “Adaptation”:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0268126/quotes:

Charlie Kaufman: There was this time in high school. I was watching you out the library window. You were talking to Sarah Marsh.

Donald Kaufman: Oh, God. I was so in love with her.

Charlie Kaufman: I know. And you were flirting with her. And she was being really sweet to you.

Donald Kaufman: I remember that.

Charlie Kaufman: Then, when you walked away, she started making fun of you with Kim Canetti. And it was like they were laughing at *me*. You didn’t know at all. You seemed so happy.

Donald Kaufman: I knew. I heard them.

Charlie Kaufman: How come you looked so happy?

Donald Kaufman: I loved Sarah, Charles. It was mine, that love. I owned it. Even Sarah didn’t have the right to take it away. I can love whoever I want.

Charlie Kaufman: But she thought you were pathetic.

Donald Kaufman: That was her business, not mine. You are what you love, not what loves you. That’s what I decided a long time ago.

However, the fact that facing rejection isn’t a difficult challenge for me didn’t keep me from enjoying Jiang’s story and tips, in “Rejection Proof“.  I liked it.  I think the gift he gives to others is helping them to be more comfortable speaking openly about being rejected, about fearing rejection, the universality of it all. He has a refreshingly strong altruistic streak motivating his exploration of the topic – not just ways to forward his own entrepreneurial success. I also enjoyed his sense of humor very much!

I was glad that he referenced the Rejection Therapy Game by Jason Comely – http://rejectiontherapy.com/. Although Jiang puts his own spin on it, I feel like this movement, if you can call it that, started before Jiang, and with Comely.

Frankly, what I have the hardest time with is saying no to others – providing rejection. And I found his suggestions related to that very helpful – for example, if you say, “No, but I know someone who would be interested,” or, “No, I can’t right now but I might be able to fit it in come springtime,” you are giving the other person valuable data and your no in some ways is a pseudo-yes. I liked his take on this and it will help me to feel less guilty when I have to do the rejecting.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book for free from the Blogging for Books program in return for an honest online review.

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